Tying the Knot in a Meaningful and Memorable Way (Without Losing Our Savings or Sanity)

Monday, February 2, 2009

Don't Get Duped


There's an unfortunate "Dear Abby" letter in the The Arizona Republic. Since it's not the first time I've heard of this happening, I thought I would share the story in case any of you are having your wedding dresses dry cleaned and "sealed" after your wedding for storage. It's scary to me to think that the Wedding Industrial Complex doesn't stop inserting itself into your life even after your wedding is over (for other ideas about what to do with your dress after the wedding, click here).
Dear Abby: A few weeks ago, my husband and I decided to clean out our garage. Stored on a top shelf was the box containing my wedding dress. I wondered what it looked like after 21 years. After our wedding night I had sent it to the cleaners to be dry-cleaned and boxed. It was returned to me with a gold seal across the opening.

I decided to break the seal and check the condition of the dress, hoping no moths had gotten to it. When I opened the box, there was no wedding dress inside. My husband asked if I had let someone borrow it. "No," I replied, "the box has been sealed all this time."

It dawned on me that my dress had never been returned from the cleaners. Please pass this on as a warning to brides to check their dress boxes!

- Duped in California




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10 comments:

Hannah Noel said...

Holy CRAP how aweful!!!
I wonder if she was able to contact the cleaners to kick their ass??? (pardon my french).

Ruthie said...

Woah. That's horrible! I would be furious, I wonder if the cleaners she took it too is still around...

AmyJean said...

I've heard about this. I believe one of the Et or Extra type shows did a undercover on this a while back. Apparently it happens more frequently than is realized. It's very scary
RelentlessBride

Anonymous said...

*gasp!* That's terrible!!! Shows how greedy some can be, I guess.

mismikado said...

That's so scary about losing your dress to the cleaners. My mom didn't have enough money to preserve her dress for storage after her wedding 25 years ago so she just put it make in it's original garment bag and stuck it in the back of her closet. It's been residing in closets for the last 25 years slowly yellowing but fortunately no moths have gotten to it. Well now I'm on the hunt for my wedding dress and although the style of hers doesn't quite fit me she has offered to disassemble it and use all of her vintage lace (which was hand-beaded by my mom and grandma and is now the perfect ivory color) to create my own dress. I'm so happy and feel so honored to keep a little piece of that tradition with me. So that's a pro to trying to store your dress, maybe your daughter won't love it as is but she can still cherish parts of it.

MsTeacherLady said...

Sketch! I'm a little confused though... did they stuff the box will something to weigh it down? It seems like an empty box would be pretty obvious since many wedding dresses are fairly heavy.

Luis said...

Another scam: Not cleaning your dress at all and just putting it in a box with a seal. There's no way of knowing whether it was done, unless you open the box, which "voids the warranty."

Chances your daughter will want to wear your dress? Close to nil. Just sell it along to someone else.

April said...

That is horrible. Every time I turn around I feel like I hear about another scam. Ick.

Anonymous said...

Awful. Actually, a friend of mine is the Executive Director for a museum that deals with a lot of very old textiles, and she told me that no one should get their dresses dry cleaned/preserved and boxed, because the chemicals just sit and eat away the dress. Fancy fabrics are just to fragile in the long term, and will basically disintegrate. Several times people have come to the museum with a dress from the 50s or 60s that they boxed up and they now want to donate, and are shocked to find holes in the dress when they open the box. (Of course, I have no idea if the same chemicals are used now that were in use decades ago, but they were thought to be "fabric safe" at the time just like our current products...) The best thing to do (so she says) is just keep it in a museum-quality box or garment bag and get used to the idea that white fabrics will yellow over time, because that is preferable to losing the garment's integrity.
I am not a textiles conservator myself or anything, but I certainly won't be dry cleaning and boxing the dress I will buy...a word to the wise.

Kristen C. said...

Wouldn't the box have been suspiciously light when she picked it up from the cleaners all those years ago?

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